H1N1 Influenza Center

From the Publishers of the New England Journal of Medicine

Online First May 7, 2009, from the New England Journal of Medicine Online First May 7, 2009, from the New England Journal of Medicine Online First May 7, 2009, from the New England Journal of Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Emergence of a Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus in Humans
Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Investigation Team
Full Text | PDF | Supplementary Material

Triple-Reassortant Swine Influenza A (H1) in Humans in the United States, 2005–2009
V. Shinde and Others
Full Text | PDF | Supplementary Material

EDITORIALS
H1N1 Influenza A Disease — Information for Health Professionals
L.R. Baden and Others
Full Text | PDF | Video

Implications of the Emergence of a Novel H1 Influenza Virus
R.B. Belshe
Full Text | PDF

PERSPECTIVE
Digital Disease Detection — Harnessing the Web for Public Health Surveillance
J.S. Brownstein, C.C. Freifeld, and L.C. Madoff
Full Text | PDF

Influenza A (H1N1) Virus, 2009 — Online Monitoring
J.S. Brownstein, C.C. Freifeld, and L.C. Madoff
Full Text | PDF | Interactive Map

The Signature Features of Influenza Pandemics — Implications for Policy
M.A. Miller and Others
Full Text | PDF

12 Responses »

  1. Re. Paper 1 and 2

    Were any of the internal genes sequenced? Are the sequences available? If they weren’t how was the triple ressortments determined? Internal gene accession numbers aren’t provided. If the analyzes were done could these be presented in the Supplementary material. Would be very helpful.

  2. The editorial staff at the Journal should be commended for their efforts to build on already existing quality information on the Web. I’m wondering why there wasn’t this much attention drawn to the SARS outbreak that began in late 2002-early 2003?

  3. Très intéressant les articles
    [Very interesting articles]

    Marc FEUSSOM
    http://www.africavet.com/

  4. Thanks Dr. D.

    But what about the viruses from paper 2, The conclusions is that these viruses were from the triple reassortant swine viruses, so then the internal genes have been sequenced to make that conclusion? But they’re not mentioned in the paper.

  5. although it is a new virus strain infecting human body ,till now it does not differ much from commonly seen inflenza virus .it is crucial to investigate the virus behaviour meticulously but it is unwiseful to give great panic informations to the community regarding its danger with my regard

  6. very good. thank you very much.

  7. Very helpful and informative.

  8. Thanks for putting this information together. The web is becoming increasingly important for public health monitoring such is the case for the swine flu. “Digital Disease Detection — Harnessing the Web for Public Health Surveillance” by Brownstein et al. helps explain this fact.

  9. In his article, “Implications of the Emergence of a Novel H1 Influenza Virus,” Belshe indicated that inflammatory political posturing occurred in response to the novel H1N1 virus. One factor that might have contributed to the inappropriate responses was the name, “swine flu,” initially used by public health officials. The name “swine flu” led non-public health officials, the media, and the public to assume that pigs spread the disease. The inappropriate slaughter of 300,000 pigs by the Egyptian government could be explained by the fact that the proper response to “avian flu” had been to slaughter poultry. (1) Public health officials subsequently switched to using the term influenza A H1N1 to prevent further unnecessary animal slaughter.

    Similar misunderstandings with future influenza outbreaks are likely to occur since the disease infects both animals and humans. One solution would be to approach influenza pandemics the way we do with hurricanes by using simple, predetermined, non-judgmental names. This strategy might reduce the risk of scape-goating, needless slaughtering of animals, or boycotting of products during future influenza crises.(2)

    References

    1. Michael, M. “Egypt’s Christians See Bias in Pig Slaughter,” Washington Post. May 4, 2009.
    2. Kahn LH. “Stirring Up “Swine Flu” Hysteria. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. May 11, 2009 (http://www.thebulletin.org/web-edition/columnists/laura-h-kahn/stirring-swine-flu-hysteria)

  10. Dear editor,

    Let me congratulate your team for the quick responce to the pandemic by puttingup this amount of fact sheet for our consumption. This wmpowerment of knowledge goes a long way in containing the outbreaks.

    Regarding the pandemic of 2009 I have some obsevations. It has mainly affected the cocsakian population. Africa so far is exemted. Asians are less affected though a large no. of cases have been reported from Japan. Now Vietnam has reported cases. US though grossly hit has been able to reduce mortality probably because of the well developed health management. It is only alarming that still it is spreading. Pandemic definition is getting modified in the modern era of jet age.

    Earlier experience had shown that third generation transmitted virus was less virulant. What is the status in the present context?

    Nagaraj

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